2017, life, writing

On Beauty

​Sometimes, when the world holds you down for a while, you forget how beautiful people are.

I saw so many people today, and they reminded me.

I saw someone with piercings, a hooded tank top, and cropped, blue hair. And I thought, this person is beautiful.

I saw three men in business wear, one with a wide green tie, one with his sleeves rolled to the elbow, one with his top button popped open. And I thought, these men are beautiful.

I saw a girl in a hijab the colour of a peach, her eye-liner sharper than a knife, her contour better than anything I’d ever seen. And I thought, this girl is beautiful.

The hope, the empowerment, the subtlety of a smile – these things awakened in me a light, shining on all the wonderful things around me.

And it doesn’t matter if you don’t wear crop tops and high-waisted shorts, or if you do.

And it doesn’t matter if you paint yourself with makeup everyday, sometimes, or never.

And it doesn’t matter if your clothes are made for your gender, or if they’re not.

You exist in a world that tries to hold you down. You shine in the darkness of misplaced hope, of disappointment and frustration. You live a life only you could lead, drawn to things only you can understand.

You, friend, are beautiful.

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2016, Uncategorized

Why Gender Stereotypes Are Holding Us Back

“Wear a pretty dress.”
“Grow your hair long.”
“Put some makeup on.”

Or, you know, I could do whatever the hell I want.


Gender stereotypes are more outdated than rotary egg beaters. They’re dumber than Valentine’s chocolates on sale on Boxing Day. They’re worse than wearing pants on a Sunday.

The idea that someone born with female genitalia should be fragile, aesthetically pleasing (what does that even mean?) and sexually reserved is, apart from being astoundingly ridiculous and frankly, offensive, a notion that (shockingly) society doesn’t need to ensure the longevity of the human race.

The expectation for someone born with XY chromosomes to be emotionally colour-blind, physically strong and fearless to the point of recklessness is not only damaging to the psyche of every young boy who doesn’t fit this description, but is also making a princely contribution to the gender hierarchy that’s wreaking havoc on the bras of a few select feminists, and at the very least enraging a few billion less select human beings who believe in equality.

In simpler terms, gender stereotypes are stupid and we don’t need them.


My gender doesn’t affect my ability to smile at people when I’m walking down the street. It doesn’t change how many friends I have and love. It doesn’t impact how I word a sentence or blow bubbles, both of which I like to think I’m good at.

I play bass guitar. I play soccer with the guys. I’m pretty good at the parallel bars, a solely male sport. I’m fond of button-down shirts. I like feeling dapper. I am currently sporting a mad undercut with accompanying man-bun, but I’m not a man.

I spend too much money on tea dresses. I have a soft spot for Elmo. I feel most confident when I’m wearing fierce eye makeup. I love to sing. I like wearing earrings. I’m short and slight. I played with Barbies as a kid. I still take my teddy bear on every school camp. I adore John Green books.

It looks like I’ve separated these traits into ‘boy-traits’ and ‘girl traits’ – but the truth is, these are all just parts of my identity. None of these attributes make me more or less myself.

Stop using the words ‘girly’ and ‘manly.’ Stop telling people, especially kids and adolescents, to toughen up or act more ladylike. Everyone on the planet is made up of a billion different traits, all of which are intrinsically their own whether we choose to assign a gender to them or not. The only difference is a bit more self-esteem, a bit more confidence. A bit less bullying, a bit less unhappiness.

A bit more equality.

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Uncategorized

The Quote Challenge: Day 1

Thankyou to https://amommasview.wordpress.com for nominating me for the quote challenge!

The rules are:
– publish a good quote a day for three consecutive days
– thank the person who nominated you
– nominate three others to do the challenge.

For today:

“ It is easy to forget how full the world is of people, full to bursting, and each of them imaginable and consistently misimagined.”

– John Green, Paper Towns

I know Paper Towns is blowing up in cinema’s at the moment, so I’m doing my absolute best to avoid being a cliche. But I think this book, and all the words in it, are very important. The book taught me a lot about people. I appreciated that.

Xx Loony

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Uncategorized

Tonight and Every Night

I am just about to go to sleep, but before I do there is something I’d like to say.

I want you to know that tonight, and every night
as I am drifting off into nothingness
I make plans

I make plans that tonight, and every night
I will dream of blank notebooks
and fountain pens
and new book smell
and fresh rain smell

Empty cardboard boxes
and road trips
and lakes
and driving through the city at night

Good music
and better company
and inside jokes
and the kind of laughter that cannot be helped
and doesn’t try to be

I want you to know that tonight,
and every night
I dream of the world and how lucky I am to be in it
and the people I know and how lucky I am to know them
and the things I have done and how lucky I am to have done them
and the amazing days I have lived and how lucky I am to have lived them

And I really hope that tonight,
and every night
you do too.

Xx

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